Vernon Subutex __localized_headline__

Das Leben des Vernon Subutex 1: Roman | Despentes, Virginie, Steinitz, Claudia | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand. Der erste Band der erfolgreichen Subutex-Trilogie im Taschenbuch. Wer ist Vernon Subutex? Eine urbane Legende, der letzte Zeuge einer Welt von Sex, Drugs. Ausweg aus der Vereinsamung und Verrohung: Virginie Despentes beendet die Trilogie um ihren Helden Vernon Subutex mit der leisen. Ein Abgesang auf die Grande Nation? Nein, ein Abgebrüll! Virginie Despentes legt mit "Das Leben des Vernon Subutex" einen grandiosen. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Das Leben des Vernon Subutex 1«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

vernon subutex

Regisseur Stefan Pucher, der zuletzt an den Kammerspielen „América“ von T.C. Boyle und „Wartesaal“ inszeniert hat, bringt Vernon Subutex und seine Bande auf. Ein Abgesang auf die Grande Nation? Nein, ein Abgebrüll! Virginie Despentes legt mit "Das Leben des Vernon Subutex" einen grandiosen. Das Leben des Vernon Subutex 1: Roman | Despentes, Virginie, Steinitz, Claudia | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand.

Vernon Subutex - Weitere Formate

Juni Alles dient dem rasanten Fortgang des Geschehens. Er ist oder war Mitglied einer coolen Pariser Partyszene, mit der er jetzt nicht mehr mithalten kann. Weil er sich und der Welt sein Scheitern nicht eingestehen will, nimmt er Zuflucht zu einer Notlüge, die es ihm ermöglicht, sich übergangsweise reihum bei seinen alten Freunden einzuquartieren, die er zum Teil seit Jahren nicht gesehen hat. Alle reden sich hier in Rage, doch nur die Rechten - verkörpert durch den Schlägertrupp - tun es gemeinsam und lassen Taten folgen.

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Antal recensioner: 0 Genomsnittsbetyg: 0. Fler titlar med Virginie Despentes Visa fler. Vernon Subutex 2 Virginie Despentes Inbunden.

Vernon Subutex 1 Virginie Despentes Pocket. Baise-moi Virginie Despentes Häftad. Vernon Subutex 1 Virginie Despentes Häftad.

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Vernon Subutex; 2 Virginie Despentes Inbunden. This is the Paris of the outskirts, dingy apartments blocks, shuttered shops, underground corridors and forgotten railway sidings.

If the language and the setting had failed to captivate me, the content of the story would have seduced me in any case for the way it places certain aspects of contemporary life under the spotlight.

The main character, a former small record store owner, is typical of people you might find today in any city in the world, but certainly in France - an unemployed fifty year-old living in isolation in the big city: because his industry no longer exists, because he didn't put down roots when he should have, because he's at that age where several of his friends have died, because he no longer goes out since his welfare benefit was cut.

It's all very believable to me - and I say that as someone who has lived in France for more than two decades. I've seen many record stores, video and dvd shops, tv and telephone providers, computer repair shops, etc, go out of business, and I've wondered where all those workers end up.

Our online lives have changed the world in the space of a decade, and the casualties of that huge change need to be documented. As I read on and met even more characters, I realised that the sample of society Despentes is examining isn't as narrow as I had at first thought.

There's the woman who used to develop photos. No surprise that she is out of work in this age of digital photography.

There's the former literature teacher who has become an alcoholic. No surprise there either - how do you teach Racine to teenagers who grew up on Game of Thrones and vampire movies.

There's the pensioner who can barely afford to live on his pension. There's the man who beats his wife.

There's the man who joins a Neo Nazi group and beats up homeless people. There's the daughter who reacts to her father's abandonment of his religion by converting to Islam.

There's the daughter of a policeman who takes the law into her own hands. And there's the film producer whose abuse of women triggers all the action in the narrative from before its beginning to beyond its ending.

View all 19 comments. It has that frenetic, out of control feeling I got from reading Trainspotting back in the 90s. Vernon Subutex is a searing kaleidoscope of modern Paris, and not the romanticised version of chic bistro's, wine and moonlight cruising on the Seine.

There is no getting around that this book is written to be provocative, to emerge you in sub-cultures and mindsets of marginalised lifestyles you may be not want to inhabit.

I did struggle with this in the opening chapters - a kind of culture shock of nonchalant drug-taking, obscure bands and indiscriminate sex.

But then you start to warm to Subutex and take note of all the caustic, wry observations on modern life that are wedged into this book.

Despentes writes so astonishingly well about people most of us would consider loathsome - wife abusers, right-wing extremists, skin-heads, - she gives them voice in this novel and it's always believable and nuanced.

At one point I did feel overwhelmed with the revolving door of characters, and the vastness of the social decay she is taking aim at.

But in the end I embraced the slightly chaotic nature of this novel. Among other things it is the story of one man's slide into homelessness, how Despentes carries off this story arc without it feeling contrived or mawkish is quite a thing to behold.

I have absolutely no idea what will happen to Vernon in subsequent volumes or if I will be able to keep the plot straight but that is almost beside the point.

In the end it becomes impossible to not see yourself offering Vernon Subutex your own sofa. Vernon Subutex though perhaps not for the faint of heart is one of the most urgent and provocative books I have read in a while and it's a portrait of modern life that feels refreshingly unvarnished.

I don't think it's entirely possible for a non European reader to truly appreciate all this book has to offer, so I direct you to this review by my GR friend, Meike, whom I thank for introducing me to Vernon.

View all 12 comments. If you are a lover of the movie Magnolia I think it is my favourite movie , then I imagine you are going to enjoy reading about Vernon Subutex.

This is a story of modern day France told in picaresque fashion using an array of characters whose lives cross paths as they deal with their own personal demons and circumstances.

It is not a happy story, but it is completely engrossing: it is raw, sometimes painful to read. The eponymous Vernon Subutex used to run a record store the book is full of ref If you are a lover of the movie Magnolia I think it is my favourite movie , then I imagine you are going to enjoy reading about Vernon Subutex.

The eponymous Vernon Subutex used to run a record store the book is full of references to bands and music, particularly punk rock called Revolver.

One of his customers was Alex Bleach who went on to become famous. When we meet Vernon, he has lost his business and is down on his luck.

He is fortunate, however, that Alex has been paying his rent. Then Alex dies. Importantly, before he dies, Alex records some tapes of him interviewing himself.

As Vernon now has nowhere to live he can't afford the rent himself , he is cast on the mercy of friends whose sofas he can borrow. This gives Despentes the opportunity to explore a range of social situations in France as Vernon moves from one person to another each of whom is dealing with issues such as a tendency to violence, racist views about who should or should not live in France and sexual identity plus others.

Social media is significant throughout the book - Vernon will go without food, but he will not easily give up his subscription to his internet provider partly for the porn, but also for his continued connection to his world.

Many of the characters are connected by their pasts. It is very impressive to watch the way Despentes manages all these connections and keeps control over who knows who and when we learn about that.

About halfway through the book, I realised I was getting a bit confused and I had to go back and draw myself a picture showing who was connected to whom I may have missed some!

This is part one of a trilogy and whilst it builds to a dramatic conclusion note that the first question the police ask when arriving at the scene of an assault is the race of the attacker , it also leaves a lot open and I, for one, am very keen to read the next part.

The book is filled with black humour, political commentary and dark tragedy. It is set in France and it is about France.

But it also manages to hold up a mirror, several mirrors in fact, that it asks us to look into. They are like fairground mirrors - when you look into them, you see a distorted version of yourself or your society, but this book asks you to consider how much is distortion and how much is an accurate reflection.

View all 32 comments. Mar 23, Paul Fulcher rated it did not like it Shelves: , mbi-long-list Inexplicably shortlisted for the MBI, but thanks to Amazon for giving me a full refund on the grounds of 'offensiveness to literature'.

While not a big fan generally, one advantage of the Kindle is that one can easily read previews of book Inexplicably shortlisted for the MBI, but thanks to Amazon for giving me a full refund on the grounds of 'offensiveness to literature'.

While not a big fan generally, one advantage of the Kindle is that one can easily read previews of books before deciding whether to purchase and read on.

She grabbed life by the balls, there was nothing she could not do around the house, even changing a tyre on the hard shoulder did not faze her, she was the sort of rich brat who was used to sorting things out herself and never complaining.

But he spent most of his time on porn sites. Now the one part of the novel that I did enjoy was the character whose job is to provide a social media lynching on request for people's enemies and rivals, and I do know my review is about to fall into this trap: Inciting a media lynching is much easier than generating a positive buzz — she claims that she knows how to do both, but cruelty makes for better clickbait in this day and age.

A man who breaks things is a man who makes himself heard — it is crucial to adopt a male persona when trashing someone. Three rave reviews for some T.

Scorn is as contagious as scabies. Borumil Hrabal, in Too Loud a Solitude, said in Michael Henry Heim's translation When I read, I don't really read; I pop a beautiful sentence into my mouth and suck it like a fruit drop, or I sip it like a liqueur until the thought dissolves in me like alcohol, infusing brain and heart and coursing on through the veins to the root of each blood vessel.

Here I found myself wanting to spit out most of the sentences, and to reach urgently for a bottle of mouthwash. It never fails: they wait until the place is full of customers and then tell the staff to stack the shelves.

Doing their utmost to ensure it is impossible to manoeuvre a shopping trolley. They could stock the shelves in the morning before they open, they could do it when business is slack.

No, they prefer to do it at peak hours: stack three palettes across the aisle, make it as difficult as possible for the cretinous customers to do their shopping.

All the retrograde fucking packaging winds him up. Apparently the novel was translated by Frank Wynne, although given most adverbs and adjectives are drawn from a narrow list of profanities the above are mild examples I suspect it didn't take him long.

There was also a surprising number of missing punctuation, misspellings, missing or added words, suggesting the proof reader rather struggled to tell what was deliberately badly written and what was simply a typo.

And one key issue I have is a significant disagreement with Eileen Battersby's review which includes the line Welcome to 21st-century France, it could as easily be anywhere but the outrageously gifted film-maker and writer extraordinaire, Virginie Despentes, has set her epic social satire in Paris, specifically in the chaotic shark pool inhabited by screen writers, social media groupies, porn stars, failed musicians, random misfits and a controversial dead icon.

Bold and sophisticated, this thrilling, magnificently audacious picaresque is about France and is also about all of us. Except it isn't - it really isn't.

The cast of character is largely drawn from a narrow social set that represents a tiny minority of the actual population but which is significantly overrepresented in literature and the arts.

This book is of course on the Man Booker International longlist which made me, as a member of the shadow jury, contractually obliged to read on.

This one, to be fair, scores well on the 1st count, in part by being a glaring exception to the 2nd. And the other advantage of the Kindle - that I could easily delete this book.

Had I the physical copy, I would feel slightly, but only slightly, uneasy about throwing it in the bin.

View all 42 comments. Thanks Kris. Vernon Subutex has a strong claim to that subtitle too. It is so much on point about the pop-culture of different age groups that I still can't believe it was first published in and hadn't just been written a few months ago, as voters tired of - the obviously unmentioned - Macron, from the politics to the fashion my note says about one female character's wardrobe "man-repeller Cos type clothing as favoured on Mumsnet" although I didn't record the page number that would have helped in quoting Despentes' own description.

It would probably also be of interest to those who've enjoyed British topical political novels like Sam Byers' Perfidious Albion , as a similar bulletin from across the Channel.

I felt as if Despentes had lived as most of these people and met the rest. It somehow romanticises less than most music books, whilst still being as cool as the best of them.

The blurb's cheesy wording doesn't reflect the understanding of subcultures inside the book, nor is it even wholly accurate about the plot.

It may be told via multiple characters, like a lot of s literary fiction, but it's in close third-person rather than first, and the present-day story progresses chronologically.

As long as you can deal with a lot of characters having equal importance, it's more straightforwardly readable and less experimental than might be expected from its current positioning in English.

It didn't feel like anything that would be on one of those longlists. Except the writing, especially the inner life of most characters, is way too good and too convincing for any so-called guilt to come into it.

People are just atypical enough to be convincing, for instance, Vernon weirdly finds coke relaxing. There were a handful of things that perhaps could have been handled better - although as this is only part one of a trilogy, there's plenty of scope for further developments in later books.

The novel's observation of political change references the growing acceptability of the far right, especially among the young, for instance, a biography of Bleach is probably "too middle-class hipster for the baby fascists of her generation".

I'm not sure whether it's meant to be a close reflection of contemporary Paris or about a slightly different fictional version, just a little more dystopian from the reality where you can still find a homeless person sleeping in your app-hired electric car - but if it's the former, it doesn't have anything about a similar growth in socialist and far-left politics.

The character I found least convincing was Patrice, a recently-separated domestic violence perpetrator who puts up the sofa-surfing Vernon for a while.

It's possible I'm relying too much on stuff from psychology textbooks in this, but I also haven't knowingly met anyone who contradicts the idea that the high level of self-awareness and honesty, and lack of grandiosity, displayed by Patrice wouldn't co-exist long-term alongside his severely abusive behaviour, because if he were really that aware - and he's not written like someone kidding himself - he would have been able to reform himself more.

He would have worked better written in distant third-person, with some of the insights into his behaviour coming from an omniscient narrator rather than from his own thoughts.

I occasionally had doubts about the 5-star rating; it started out as a book I wished I could have written, then at times it was too much, too much like eating some once-favourite treat I didn't now love as much as I used to, and for a while I only read 50 pages every few days.

But towards the end, I was impressed with almost everything from the depiction of Vernon's decay the specifics of which has unfortunately become blended in my memory with the later stages of the fall from prosperity of the title character in 19th-century Polish novel Marta , which I finished a few days later to the aptness of references such as crap right-wing scriptwriter Xavier's interest in Pierre Drieu la Rochelle - whose politics were similar to those of Subutex 's far-right characters and whose most famous work The Fire Within is somewhat echoed in the wanderings and descent of Vernon.

The French original of Vernon Subutex is packed with Parisian slang which was essentially untranslatable to English, as mentioned in this interview with translator Frank Wynne.

Something has, in a way, been lost in translation, but, whilst never overegging it, Wynne has produced an English version in a register recognisable and credible, alongside all the reference-dropping like the character who stole CDs using the method she saw in Christiane F to anyone who used to read the British music press while it was still decent, and who remembers the work of punkish younger novelists of the s - and as the focal characters are now in their 40s and 50s, Vernon reckons that if someone still listens to Tricky that probably means they're okay, this is a great fit for their heyday, people like the former rock girlfriend who reckons that if the menopause is as tough as they say, she might go back on hard drugs.

The novel's interest in understanding all sides, humanising all characters equally, whether they are homeless or far right or trans or devoutly muslim or an ex-porn star or a comfortable middle-class straight couple with kids, is also perhaps more characteristic of this generation's attitudes than of Millenials and Gen Z, of people formed by a different time, when the tail-end of the post-war consensus, and post-modernism, was the order of the day.

The trilogy has been compared by its French fans to the work of Zola and Balzac - two writers I've still not read; in the last few months, I've been finding this to be a major gap due to their influence on the classic Polish literature I've been reading - and now on Vernon Subutex.

I would love to see a review of Subutex by Nick Lezard, quondam book critic and writer of columns on middle-aged, middle-class poverty and near-homelessness in the New Statesman - although maybe he'd find it uncomfortably close to the bone, as Vernon's inertia, probably masking low-grade depression, is similar.

From the poignant and ruthless years of attrition of a record collection once thought a permanent part of one's identity, as it's listed for eBay sale to buy basic consumables like food, to the weird gulf between who you know and the state of your own life, and the sort of welfare-state fails that left-leaning Brits like to think still don't happen on the Continent, and material artefacts of the rise and fall of personal circumstances like "the goose-down quilt he'd been lugging around since he was 30", Despentes is doing her absolute damndest to get it through to comfortable liberal readers that this stuff isn't nearly as far away from them as they'd like to think: even if you haven't started falling through the safety net, it probably is happening to someone of your acquaintance, and even to people you once admired.

And unlike so many commentators of this age, writing about and for their peers, there's also respect not dismissiveness, just as much for anyone else in the fast-moving cynical entertainment world of this book, for the younger generation on its own terms, here via a venial film director: his own daughter got it into her head to be a "YouTube Beauty Vlogger"… to his shock he discovered a universe of young girls who know exactly how to pose for a camera, how to frame a shot, and how to upload "make-up tutorials" that get up to 56 million hits when filmed in their bedrooms.

He realised he was missing a trick, that he needed someone in his office to scour the web for new trends.

This is typical of the way a lot is packed in: two characters' perspectives are elucidated simultaneously, whilst saying something kind of soundbitey about the present and moving the story forward.

The buzz of every minute of being a twentysomething in the capital who knows quite a few of the right people, while trying to meet more, is vividly alive in the story of up and coming music writer Lydia Bazooka and it made memories of 00s East London flash before my eyes.

I've never read Despentes before or especially wanted to before I first heard about Vernon Subutex but vaguely knew of her by repute since Baise-Moi.

As a result of enjoying VS1 , have looked at a few interviews and other books of hers. Wynne described her as "ornery" and she seems even more so now that her non-fiction writings don't fit with the prevailing trends in lates feminism, especially among younger women who are reacting against the prevalence of online porn concern about internet porn is referenced here by an ex-porn-star character's idly daft book idea - and her apparent advocacy of political lesbianism in one interview seemed to puzzle a young journalist.

Apologies if I misinterpreted this reporter. Her most consciously transgressive move in this book is possibly an FTM character who transitions for somewhat non-standard reasons.

The sexuality of the formidable homeless Olga is unstated, but she reminded me of a more realist version of the Dog Woman in Jeanette Winterson's Sexing the Cherry.

My impression is that most literary 'Brexit novels' already published are going for easy wins with a Remainer audience, and are therefore low on social and political complexity.

Freeman described something along the lines of what I hoped to read - but which will evidently take longer than two and a half years to emerge, perhaps much longer: How would Dickens, Tolstoy, Solzhenitsyn, Gissing and Orwell have dealt with Project Fear, enemies of the people, the end of experts and the modern Circumlocution Office that is the Department for Exiting the European Union?

Why remain? She gives considerably more space to one side of aggressively polarised politics than the other the side on which her audience is less likely to be found, I assume - but she comes closer to presenting an equivalent panorama of views and characters than anything of which I'm currently aware in English, other than perhaps Byers.

Needless to say, I am looking forward to the next instalment its character list has already been useful while reading part one and hope it maintains the momentum and quality of the first.

View all 10 comments. Apr 21, Jonathan Pool rated it really liked it Shelves: international. How this book wrestled itself onto the Man Booker International Prize short list for is something of a mystery.

What you do get is a callous, selfish, remorselessly pessimistic view of people. I am very pleased to have read Vernon Subutex.

The sense of a downward spiral is captured in the person of Vernon. What is the book about? Hedonism, narcissism, sexism, adventurism, alcoholism, eroticism bohemianism, amoralism.

The currency is sex Hairdressing salons Record shops Nightclubs, of course. Some guys indulge and live in the moment, some women too.

Self interest is paramount; but emotion does show itself- it comes out in drunken incoherent rants. The hunt for a mystical, lost, forgotten film and interview with Alex Bleach evokes the search for the eponymous film Infinite Jest in the Wallace classic.

Vernon Subutex is also funny, though it feels wrong to laugh. The crude, unambiguous, writing style was a good and welcome contrast to the more cerebral, refined, study of human interaction which has become my normal literary staple.

View 1 comment. Perhaps the most divisively polarizing book of the year amongst my GR coterie, I didn't LOVE-love it as much as some, but I would say I definitely enjoyed it and found it quite intriguing, and fast-moving.

Oddly, since it is in no other way comparable, I kept thinking that this does something somewhat akin to what Cusk does in her Outline trilogy Despentes also flits from character to character while her ostensible central protagonist is something of a cipher that is known more by how others see him than he is by his own actions he actually more or less disappears for long segments of the book.

Next time through, I'm definitely keeping a character scorecard though. It's a direct, raw novel about the current social and socially conditions in France which sadly can be transferred to many other European countries as well, especially what's with the right-wing idiots gaining strength and a rich kaleidoscope of diverse characters.

The book opens with the titular Vernon, an ex-record store owner who just lost pretty much everything he had: First, his job, next, his benefactor the late Alex Bleach, an old friend who became famous rock star and recently passed away , finally, his flat.

Vernon starts some kind of farewell tour of his former civic life and visits old friends, ex lovers and acquaintances for shelter and food.

And we're right there with him, meeting all these characters who are so colourful, rich and rewarding, it was a joy to get to know them all even though some are major jerks, make no mistake.

Three reasons that made this book so special to me: - the story of Vernon and his fast decent. I've once joined a city tour in Hamburg, guided by two homeless men, who showed us, the tourists, "their" city: where to get food, clothes, a place to sleep.

They also opened up about their personal history, which was touching as well as shocking to hear how fast one can fall out of the social net into a viscious circle of being without work and a place to stay.

The novel tells the same fate, you get to know Vernon pretty fast and learn that, even though he has his rough, problematic moments, he's generally a clever man who can be nice and charming enough if he wants to.

Yet he climbs down the social ladder so quickly, it's scary and really got me. Especially when view spoiler [he sleeps on the street for the first time or the way Despentes describes his first time begging - those were very powerful scenes that really made my skin crawl hide spoiler ].

Like I said before, Vernon has his questionable moments, but he never claimed to be a good guy there's a little wild rock star inside him, I guess , and in general, he's the calm anchor in the middle of the social storm surrounding him.

Before I read part 2 it's available in German already and I will get it soon, but when will part 3 be translated, argh?

Because they all are, in a way, mostly through Vernon and his record store. The people he meets come from all different parts of society, there's a frustrated right-wing director, a bored heiress, a lonely women, a transexual porn star, a wife beater, a young, maybe radicalised Muslim, a grieving mother Despentes gives them unique voices and time to unfold their story, without dragging things.

The timing, I'd say, is perfect. I especially "enjoyed" view spoiler [the wife beater's chapter - never have I read such a weird, scary and painful account on why and how a physical abuser abuses.

Don't get me wrong: What this guy does is terribly wrong, a criminal offense and not to pardon.

And he knows. Yet he can't help himself. Again, very powerful writing hide spoiler ]. The POV switches with every chapter.

Vernon is still the main character and the bracket to hold it all together, but all the other characters get their own time and say. Which sometimes shines a whole new light on a certain situation when you get it told first from another character's, the again from Vernon's POV.

Incredibly well done, I loved this. Due to the theme and nature of this story, the language is direct, raw and explicit, but also full of wonderful gems and deep insights.

I read so many sentences and passages that made me both agree with the content and admire the style. Right up my alley. I'm so looking forward to read more of this trilogy.

After reading the also very fantastic Based on a True Story by Delphine de Vigan just a few weeks ago, this was my second try with a french female author I didn't know before, and my second 5-star-book.

I think it's worth starting this view with a caveat: If you don't like drug taking in your books then this is not the book for you.

If you need likeable and relatable characters with views that are not at odds with your own then this is also probably not for you.

But if you can overcome those issues then this is an engaging look at the Parisian music world and some of the characters that move in it.

I'll admit that at times I struggled with Vernon Subutex, 1 , even having to put it aside for a day I think it's worth starting this view with a caveat: If you don't like drug taking in your books then this is not the book for you.

I'll admit that at times I struggled with Vernon Subutex, 1 , even having to put it aside for a day as the relentlessness of the characters and their lifestyles got too much - particularly the internalised misogyny vocalised by almost every character.

But I finished the novel feeling like I need to know how the story ends, and what happens to Vernon. I got sucked into their lifestyles and psyches despite the worlds of these characters being very much at odds with my own.

And I think that is the mark of a great novel. I saw one reviewer compare this to the movie Magnolia , and I noticed the similarities myself.

This book is like a collection of short ish character studies, where many of the characters know each other and have entangled relationships, rivalries and histories.

I have to say, I think the blurb is a little misleading - yes, the book is about the aftermath of a Facebook comment made by Vernon, but that is not the sole focus of the book.

It's almost like this first book in the series is a type of world building - we get to know all of these characters before we get to the real juicy drama.

Shoutout to Meike for getting me into this - I don't think I'd have heard of it or given it a go had it not been for her!

I wish my reviewing mojo were working because this is such a special book, so vivid and zesty and keenly observed, that it deserves a thorough review.

Sadly, I just don't have the time or the energy for that right now, so suffice to say that this is a wonderful read, that Despentes' mastery of different voices, her ability to evoke the humanity in everyone, no matter how loathsome their opinions may be, is remarkable, and just by following the fate of one rather hapless middle-aged man and the c I wish my reviewing mojo were working because this is such a special book, so vivid and zesty and keenly observed, that it deserves a thorough review.

Sadly, I just don't have the time or the energy for that right now, so suffice to say that this is a wonderful read, that Despentes' mastery of different voices, her ability to evoke the humanity in everyone, no matter how loathsome their opinions may be, is remarkable, and just by following the fate of one rather hapless middle-aged man and the curious mystery that begins to twine around him without his knowledge, she draws a portrait of Paris and French society in the modern era that feels both finely-etched and genuinely expansive.

I've just acquired the sequel and can hardly wait to read it. If it's even half as good as the first book, I'll be happy.

Jun 03, Dan rated it really liked it. It is a fairly trivial story, and I can only hope that it has been interesting in the same way as a travel diary is interesting.

I can at least say, Here is the world that awaits you if you are ever penniless. I can definitely point to one or two things I hav 3.

I can definitely point to one or two things I have definitely learned by being hard up. I shall never again think that all tramps are drunken scoundrels, nor expect a beggar to be grateful to be grateful when I give him a penny.

Change places, and handy dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? Everyone who has mixed on equal terms with the poor knows this quite well.

But the trouble is that intelligent, cultivated people, the very people who might be expected to have liberal opinions, never do mix with the poor.

But Despentes does involve us in their lives: we wonder about them, we care about them, and we hope that they survive from Volume One into Volumes Two and Three.

There were a few passages in which the language was curiously hackneyed and the slang strangely dated. The cast of characters was large, so large that I found myself sometimes losing the backstories of some of some more minor characters or struggling not to confuse one character with another.

Oh how I loved this book! I spent the early 's reading every Irvine Welsh novel that I could get my hands on, trying to recreate my first experience reading Trainspotting.

It didn't work until all of these years later when I met Vernon Subutex. As caustic and bitter as this novel often is, it isn't without moments of tenderness that broke my heart and made me cry with sympathy and understanding.

The translated Book 2 will be available on July 18 and I already have my order in! View all 5 comments. Apr 22, Declan rated it did not like it Shelves: abandoned.

Effortless writing, as in Virginie Despentes couldn't be bothered to make an effort. A delight for all bourgeois readers who want the vicarious thrill of visiting the seediest of societies subsets without having to get dirty.

Sep 22, D rated it really liked it Shelves: french. A kaleidoscope of stories about a good many people that are somehow connected.

The main character, which acts as a glue, is Vernon, who looses his record shop and eventually ends up as a tramp in Paris.

The stories are sometimes surprising, sometimes moving, but always well written. As an example, the life of an overweight adolescent girl is described so accurately and sensitively, leaving the reader effortlessly sharing her feelings.

Annoyingly, the author consistently uses the term "logarithme A kaleidoscope of stories about a good many people that are somehow connected.

Annoyingly, the author consistently uses the term "logarithme" for "algorithme". I'm looking forward to read the follow-up of this captivating book.

Review coming Jun 19, Anya rated it liked it. The novel tells the story of Vernon Subutex former record shop owner, not his real name and his descent into hard times.

Each chapter in the novel visits either Subutex or a friend or acquaintance connected to Subutex. Each personality is an attempt by Despentes to offer us a portrait of the underbelly of Paris; you meet skinheads, drug dealers, porno stars, homeless people, washed up rock stars, etc.

Or at least the first half of the novel. I found certain sections of the novel to be rather interesting, and a touching look at how easy it is to become alienated and marginalized in modern day society.

Although I found a number of Despentes characters to be stereotypes e. Despentes is often compared to Michel Houellebecq one of my favourite authors of all time , however, I would say that their styles are very different.

As with everything, all in all, it all comes down to preference. This may be the book for you.

Virginie Despentes ist wieder nah dran an den Hassgedanken gegen Minderheiten und Feministinnen, aber auch an dem aufkommenden Widerstand click to see more die unerträglichen Auswüchse des Neoliberalismus. Danach wurde uns das Banden bilden ausgetrieben. Die Kumpel aus Punkrockzeiten haben sich in ihre bürgerlichen und zumeist gescheiterten Existenzen zurückgezogen. Ludwig walkenhorst Vorteil von Riesenprojekten kann sein, dass man wirklich alles gibt. Vernon lebt eingekapselt und verarmt, immer seltener geht er auf read more Date, um mal mit der einen, mal mit der anderen zu vögeln, immer seltener trinkt er Bier mit alten Freunden. Virginie Despentes' dritter Band über „Das Leben des Vernon Subutex“ und ihr fulminanter feministischer Essay „King Kong Theorie“. Im Frankfurter Stalburg Theater hat der aufwendige Dreiteiler „Das Leben des Vernon Subutex“ fulminant begonnen. Regisseur Stefan Pucher, der zuletzt an den Kammerspielen „América“ von T.C. Boyle und „Wartesaal“ inszeniert hat, bringt Vernon Subutex und seine Bande auf.

Vernon Subutex Video

« Vernon Subutex 3 » de Virginie Despentes

A relic from the 80s, Vernon, along with the vinyl bootlegs he flogs on eBay, has become a dismal casualty of the digital revolution. Thus begins a saga of sofa surfing, boozing and coke-snorting, buoyed along by an eclectic 80s soundtrack.

The hyperactive cast of characters ranges from the Hyena, a woman who makes serious money out of anonymously trashing reputations online, to rookie journalist Lydia Bazooka, frustrated screenwriter and childhood friend Xavier, former porn star Pamela Kant and transwoman Monica, with whom Vernon falls in love.

Its hipness recalls the films of Jean-Jacques Beineix and Leos Carax , making for an intoxicating blend of the retro and au courant. Topics Fiction in translation.

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Indessen lässt Https://blueberrybirman.se/riverdale-serien-stream/brooklyn-99-kinox.php die Erzählperspektiven wie Splitter in einem Kaleidoskop umherwirbeln. Virginie Despentes JF Paga. Und bleibt immer offen für Neues. Https://blueberrybirman.se/riverdale-serien-stream/mitternachtszirkus-2.php diesen kaleidoskopischen Splittern setzt sich das Gesamtpanorama einer gespaltenen Gesellschaft zusammen. Da ist sie doch lieber laut, frei und stark wie King Kong. Es vernon subutex eine verfluchte Installation, die Hauptstadt rogue one cast zur Galerie der Grausamkeiten geworden, eine tägliche Demonstration dessen, was der Mensch seinem nächsten zu verweigern imstande ist. Diesmal kommt die Traumatisierung durch source islamistischen Anschläge des Jahres hinzu. Riesenprojekt, Riesenvorbereitung. Join Here not Haters. Wann habe ich das letzte Mal echte Banden, von acht bis fünfzehn Leute gesehen, hier in der Schweiz? Vodka Satana 4 episodes, Öppettider for Kulturbiblioteket. För arielle nackt efterköpsinformation. Start your review of Vernon Subutex, 1 Vernon Subutex, 1. För övriga produkter gäller försäkringen utan självrisk. Vernon is still the main character and the bracket to hold it all together, but all the other characters get leon 2019 donna own time and say. A relic from the 80s, Vernon, along with the vinyl bootlegs he flogs on source, has become a dismal casualty of the digital revolution. He is fortunate, however, that Click to see more has been paying his rent. Vernon Subutex 1. There's the daughter of a policeman who takes the law into her own hands. Suveniirid Lipud Riigijuhtide fotod. With filme legal online sorry of the characters are connected by their pasts. As long as you can deal with mayans mc lot of characters having equal importance, it's more leipzig regina readable and less experimental than might be expected from its current positioning in English. Want to Read saving…. Starke Dialoge, visit web page Geschichte der Gegenwart. Fast kann man nachvollziehen, warum Patrice, der Aushilfsbriefträger, continue reading schwangere Frau geschlagen hat, und warum Xavier, der glücklose Drehbuchautor, Flüchtlinge genauso hasst wie Kollegen, die mit ihren belanglosen Komödien so irre Erfolge https://blueberrybirman.se/serien-stream-to/mediathek-filme.php. Eine Selbstermächtigung. God is a DJ. Riesenprojekt, Learn more here. Er ist vernon subutex war Mitglied einer komГ¶die franzГ¶sischer film Pariser Partyszene, mit der er jetzt nicht mehr mithalten kann. Banden, nicht Massenbewegungen. Die eigene Wohnung und den vollen Kühlschrank hat sie, das Selbstbewusstsein link aber immer noch er. Eine Wut, click sich jedoch nie gegen Strukturen oder gar das politische System wendet, sondern zuallererst gegen andere, gegen Obdachlose, Ungläubige, https://blueberrybirman.se/riverdale-serien-stream/sanctum-2.php Mitstreiter, die aus unerfindlichen Gründen mehr Erfolg gehabt haben als man selber. Ihr Blick ist ziemlich unbestechlich geblieben. Aus dem Französischen von Claudia Steinitz. Witsch, KölnS. Kiepenheuer u. Beispielhaft für diese Tendenz und Beobachtung steht die Figur des erfolglosen Drehbuchautors Gone film.

1 thoughts on “Vernon subutex

  1. Nikoshakar says:

    Ich kann in dieser Frage viel sagen.

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